Last edited by Malara
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

1 edition of Procedural justice? found in the catalog.

Procedural justice?

Brianne McGonigle Leyh

Procedural justice?

victim participation in international criminal proceedings

by Brianne McGonigle Leyh

  • 239 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Intersentia in Cambridge, Portland .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • International criminal courts,
  • Victims of crimes,
  • Legal status, laws,
  • International crimes

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 385-407) and index.

    Other titlesVictim participation in international criminal proceedings
    StatementBrianne McGonigle Leyh
    SeriesSchool of human rights research series -- v. 42, School of Human Rights Research series -- v. 42.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKZ7495 .L49 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 452 p. ;
    Number of Pages452
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25301431M
    ISBN 101780680201
    ISBN 109781780680200
    LC Control Number2012392764
    OCLC/WorldCa754745167

    A procedural justice model of policing is likely to be only loosely coupled with police practice, despite the best intentions, and improvements in procedural justice on the part of police are unlikely to result in corresponding improvements in citizens’ perceptions of procedural justice. “Rigorous and thoughtful, this book’s careful Cited by: A collection of essays that brings together the very best philosophical and legal writings on procedural justice. It features articles that deal with the distinctive branch of justice that involves norms and processes of applying law to citizens.

    In , the Te xas Municipal Courts Education Center (Austin, Texas) received a grant from the State Justice Institute (Reston, Virginia) to work with the Center for Court Innovation (Brooklyn, New York) to develop models of effective websites and court signage that reflect the concepts of procedural justice. Thomas Pogge, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences (Second Edition), Introduction. Justice is a central moral notion, associated with fair and impartial decision procedures (procedural justice) and with persons and groups being treated even-handedly (formal justice, treating like cases alike) and in a morally fitting way (material or substantive justice).

    BOOK REVIEW PROCEDURAL JUSTICE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS. By John Thibaut and Laurens Walker. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Pp. vii, $ Reviewed by Shari Seidman Diamond* and Hans Zeisel** Anglo-American . The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice. Authors: Lind, , Tyler, Tom R. Free Preview. Buy this book eBook ,99 *immediately available upon purchase as print book shipments may be delayed due to the COVID crisis. ebook access is temporary and does not include ownership of the ebook. Only valid for books with an ebook version.


Share this book
You might also like
The two covenants and the second blessing

The two covenants and the second blessing

Aachen region

Aachen region

Tales from the blind mule

Tales from the blind mule

white dress

white dress

U.S. international narcotics control programs

U.S. international narcotics control programs

Fuller employment?.

Fuller employment?.

Richard Aldington, an Englishman.

Richard Aldington, an Englishman.

Harnessing wind power

Harnessing wind power

Ordeal in Algeria.

Ordeal in Algeria.

Agricultural utilization of sewage effluent and sludge; an annotated bibliography

Agricultural utilization of sewage effluent and sludge; an annotated bibliography

Procedural justice? by Brianne McGonigle Leyh Download PDF EPUB FB2

This item: Procedural Justice: Allocating to Individuals (Law and Philosophy Library) Set up a giveaway. Get fast, free delivery with Amazon Prime. Prime members enjoy FREE Two-Day Delivery and exclusive access to music, movies, TV shows, original audio series, and Kindle by: John Thibaut (–) was a social psychologist, one of the last graduate students of Kurt Lewin.

He spent a number of years as a professor at the Procedural justice? book of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and was the first editor of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology.4/5(1).

Book Condition: Hardcover. Binding solid, pages crisp and clean, highlighting scattered throughout. Dust jacket bright and shiny with light crease along Procedural justice?

book edge, some scuffs and dents. Extremities lightly. Book Description. This collection of essays brings together the very best philosophical and legal writings on procedural justice over the last half century.

Core concepts in Anglo-American jurisprudence, such as equal protection, due process, and the rule of law, are explained and criticized.

Procedural justice turns out to be important for the legitimacy of a political rule as well as for the acceptance of administrative decisions. The volume deals with the interrelation between. First published inthis volume explores how procedural justice, the fairness of the way decisions are reached, is an important factor in human behaviour.

In this book we see the ways that it is important for the legitimacy of a political rule as well as for the acceptance of administrative decisions. Distributive and Procedural Justice Resear ch: Epistemology, Method and Application How to measure people’ s justice judgments has been the subject of several debates.

Procedural Justice Procedural justice seeks to ensure that the justice system treats everybody with dignity and respect. Research has shown that when court users perceive the justice system to be fair, they are more likely to comply with court orders and follow the law in the future—regardless of the outcome of their case.

The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice. Book January Tom Tyler and I recently published a book exploring the process of legal socialization. This project will be a clearinghouse. Procedural justice concerns the fairness and the transparency of the processes by which decisions are made, and may be contrasted with distributive justice (fairness in the distribution of rights or resources), and retributive justice (fairness in the punishment of wrongs).

Hearing all parties before a decision is made is one step which would be considered appropriate to be taken in order that a process may then. In Constructive Divorce: Procedural Justice and Sociolegal Reform, author Penelope Eileen Bryan offers a compelling argument that the procedures used to settle divorce disputes yield unjust decisions and poor outcomes for millions of adults and children each year.

This well-researched, carefully constructed book discusses the benefits of improving procedural justice in divorce cases (greater Pages:   The Center for Court Innovation's publication, 'To Be Fair: Conversations About Procedural Justice,' is a compilation of interviews with more than 20.

Procedural justice theory assumes: •People know they can’t always win. • People will be more likely to accept losing if they perceive as fair the procedures and interpersonal treatment they received. Procedures vs. Outcomes (c) Center for Court InnovationFile Size: 7MB. Procedural Justice.

Fundamentally, procedural justice concerns the fairness and the transparency of the processes by which decisions are made, and may be contrasted with distributive justice (fairness in the distribution of rights or resources), and retributive justice (fairness in the punishment of wrongs).

Tom R. Tyler is University Professor at New York University, teaching in the Psychology Department and the Law School.

He studies the exercise of authority in groups, organizations, and societies. His many books include The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice, Social Justice in a Diverse Society, Cooperation in Groups, and Trust in the Law. General Resource Materials. Research in the field of procedural justice in the criminal justice system has grown exponentially since John Thibaut and Laurens Walker published their seminal book Procedural Justice: A Psychological Analysis (Thibaut and Walker ).In this book, the authors drew attention to how justice system processes could impact people’s perceptions of justice outcomes.

We dedicate this book to John Thibaut. He was mentor and personal friend to one of us, and his work had a profound intellectual influence on both of us. We were both strongly influenced by Thibaut's insightful articulation of the importance to psychology of the concept of pro cedural justice and by his empirical work with Laurens Walker in reactions to legal institu demonstrating the role of Reviews: 1.

The British philosopher Stephan Toulmin, in his The Uses of Argument, made the provocative claim that "logic is generalized jurisprudence". For Toulmin, logic is the study of nonns for practical argumentation and decision making.

In his view, mathematical logicians were preoccupied with fonnalizing. "Procedural Justice" offers a theory of procedural fairness for civil dispute resolution.

The core idea behind the theory is the procedural legitimacy thesis: participation rights are essential for the legitimacy of adjudicatory procedures.

The theory yields two principles of procedural justice: the accuracy principle and the participation. During the last half of the twentieth century, legal philosophy (or legal theory or jurisprudence) has grown significantly.

It is no longer the domain of a few isolated scholars in law and philosophy. Thibaut's work with Harold Kelley (; Kelley & Thibaut, ) created a social psy­ chological theory of interdependence that, among many other applica­ tions, serves as the basis for one of the major models of the psychology of procedural justice.The Paperback of the The Social Psychology of Procedural Justice by Lind, Tom R.

Tyler | at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more! Due to COVID, orders may be delayed.Assembles articles on one of the most important emerging ideas in the social psychology of conflict management - procedural justice.

This book suggests that people's reactions to conflict resolution decisions in social settings are strongly influenced by their evaluations of the fairness of the procedures used to create rules and make decisions.