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1 edition of Comparison of areal extent of snow as determined by AVHRR and SSM/I satellite imagery found in the catalog.

Comparison of areal extent of snow as determined by AVHRR and SSM/I satellite imagery

Robert W. Maxson

Comparison of areal extent of snow as determined by AVHRR and SSM/I satellite imagery

by Robert W. Maxson

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Published by Naval Postgraduate School, Available from National Technical Information Service in Monterey, Calif, Springfield, Va .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby R.W. Maxson
ContributionsDurkee, Philip A.
The Physical Object
Pagination99 p. ;
Number of Pages99
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25521023M

  The Arctic is a region in transformation. Warming in the region has been amplified, as expected from ice-albedo feedback effects, with the rate of warming observed to be ~ ± °C/decade in the Arctic (>64°N) compared to ~°C/decade globally during the last three decades. This increase in surface temperature is manifested in all components of the cryosphere. You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

Satellite Remote Sensing and GIS Applications in Agricultural Meteorology Observing System to include appropriate Research and Development (R&D) satellite missions. The recently established WMO Consultative Meetings on High-Level Policy on Satellite Matters have acted as a catalyst in each of these interwoven and important areas. Improved estimates of snow extent, and thereby of the behavior of albedo, provide essential information for climate research, numerical weather prediction (NWP) and hydrological forecasting. Long-term time series of satellite data estimates of seasonal snow cover are needed for constructing climate data records (CDR) essential for climate research.

This banner text can have markup.. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Snow-cover surveys are conducted by personnel equipped for sampling the accumulated snow and for determining its depth and water equivalent (). The number of snow courses and their location and length will depend upon the topography of the catchments and .


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Comparison of areal extent of snow as determined by AVHRR and SSM/I satellite imagery by Robert W. Maxson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Advanced Very High Radiometric (AVHRR) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) imagery are compared to determine the areal extent of snow. A multi-spectral AVHRR algorithm, utilizing channels 1 (um), 2 ( am), 3 (um), and 4 (Oum), creates a synthetic image that classified land, snow, water and clouds.

Advanced Very High Radiometric (AVHRR) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) imagery are compared to determine the areal extent of snow. A multi-spectral AVHRR algorithm, utilizing channels. Recent Northern Hemisphere snow extent: a comparison of data derived from visible and Microwave Satellite Sensors Article in Geophysical Research Letters 28(19).

Special Sensor Microwave Imagers (SSM/I) on board Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. For the period fromboth snow cover extent and snow water equivalent (snow mass) were investigated during the coldest months (May-September), primarily in. snow map, with a median of m and a SD of m when compared to the snow-probe measurements.

The Pléi-ades images benefit from a very broad radiometric range (12 bits), allowing a high correlation success rate over the snow-covered areas. This study demonstrates the value of VHR stereo satellite imagery to map snow depth in remote moun. Maxson RW () Comparison of areal extent of snow as determined by AVHRR and SSM/I satellite image.

MS Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California Google Scholar McClain EP, Pichel WG, Walton CC () Comparative performance of AVHRR-based multichannel sea surface temperature 90(C6), Google ScholarCited by: 1.

The spatial distribution of lakes greatly differs between Eurasia and North America: according to IGBP, the areal extent covered with 10% of lakes or higher is much larger in North America than in Eurasia. Methods. This section presents the algorithms used in the current study to retrieve snow depth from SSM/I by:   SCA map for 1 March is obtained using the PS values and is compared with the actual IMS snow cover maps.

Out of ground stations, ( %) indicated same land cover type (snow/no snow) between PS and IMS-based snow cover maps. Only nine stations ( %) did not match with the actual IMS snow cover by: 3. Scatterplots of SSM/I-derived snow depth against ground station snow depth for all years except and when there was little snow accumulation.

The size of circles represent the number of ground measurement sites per 1° × 1° grid by: SSM/I signature vs. snow depth and SWE are presented in Table 2. The SNODAS SWE is available from 1 October, which limits our SWE data set to winter There are three SSM/I signatures used in this analysis.

The first one named GTH (19H - 37H) is the difference between 19 and 37GHz in horizontal polarization. Unfortunately, this book can't be printed from the OpenBook.

If you need to print pages from this book, we recommend downloading it as a PDF. Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. • Acknowledgments • The Manual of Federal Geographic Data Products was published by the Federal Geo- graphic Data Committee (FGDC).

The committee, which was established by the Office of Management and Budget, undertook the Manual as part of its responsibility to promote the coordinated development, use, sharing, and dissemination of surveying, mapping, and related spatial data.

Lower bar graphs show the statistics of m'ound-based snow cover observations used in the comt)arison. Satellite-Derived Snow Cover Maps for North America study (Romanov et al., ) has shown that approximately 50% of all snow misses in the blended snow map correspond to the cases when the observed snow depth was 5 cm or by: The snow on this mountain is one of the main and important sources of the Urmia Lake water.

Therefore monitoring and studying of this parameter is crucial. For studying the snow, we must investigate the main factors of the snow including, the snow depth (SD), density of.

Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer or broad-band, four or five channel scanner, sensing in the visible, near-infrared, and thermal infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This information is used to estimate characteristics of the land and sea surface.

Satellite-Scale Snow Water Equivalent Assimilation into a High-Resolution Land Surface Model Satellite observations of snow cover area or fraction and SWE-related quantities provide a second type of (partial) information about the snow state.

As examples, the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Cited by:   Today, approximately 85 percent of the data used for sea ice analysis are satellite-derived products.

The two largest sources of satellite data are AVHRR aboard the TIROS series of satellites and OLS aboard the US Air Force DMSP satellite series. Both provide imagery in the visible and infrared portions of the spectrum. [6] Maps of snow extent and snow water equivalent (SWE) derived from passive microwave satellite data (SMMR and SSM/I) for the Northern Hemisphere have been produced at the NSIDC [Armstrong and Brodzik,] using a modified version of the Chang et al.

algorithm. Regional maps and products have also been developed in Canada from the SMMR and SSM/I data, Cited by: With the advent of the MODIS, first launched on the Terra satellite inand later on the Aqua satellite indaily fractional snow-cover and snow-albedo maps have been available at a resolution of m, thus permitting the most accurate fully automated daily Cited by: INTRODUCTION.

The Arctic is an area of intense interest because climate‐change signals are expected to be amplified in the region by about – times. 1 Ice‐albedo feedback effect 1, 2 associated with the high albedo of snow and ice which cover a large fraction of the region has been postulated as one of the key reasons for the amplification of the by:.

Location and Data: The study is conducted at southern ocean with sea ice concentration images. 12 SSM/I (Special sensor microwave imagery) sea ice concentration images of the Southern hemisphere are used to determine the high seasonal variability of the ice coverage around Antarctica.7 Weather and Air Quality: Minutes to Subseasonal INPUT SUMMARY.

Weather and air quality simulations have greatly improved over the past decade. These advances are in large part due to improved data assimilation, atmospheric physics and chemistry models, faster computers, and observations that improve, validate, evaluate, and initialize deterministic and ensemble forecast models.

SPIE Digital Library Proceedings. Proc. SPIERemote Sensing for Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Hydrology VIII, (17 October ); doi: /